LBI News

LBI News is the official newsletter of Leo Baeck Institute. It appears in print and online three times annually in Fall, Winter, and Spring. Click the image to download a PDF copy (6MB).

LBI News


LBI Launches Online Catalog for Long-Hidden Romanian Archives

An online catalog at jbat.lbi.org, unveiled at Leo Baeck Institute on January 13, describes the location and content of about 600 archival items related to Jewish life, which are housed in Romanian archives.

Database of German Exile Publishers Now Online

LBI Library and Archives staff have built an online database of publishing houses founded by German-speaking refugees outside the German Reich and occupied Europe between 1933 and 1945. The new portal gives LBI’s substantial collection of Exilliteratur a higher profile and aids in the discovery of a body of work that is not otherwise linked…

Donation of Biochemist’s Library a Case Study in Provenance & Restitution

The LBI Library has been enriched by 40 volumes of scientific literature from the former library of Carl Neuberg (1877–1956), a pioneer in the study of biochemistry. This donation, the result of restitution efforts by the Central and Regional Library of Berlin (Zentral- und Landesbibliothek Berlin – ZLB), is an emblematic case study in the complexities of provenance research and the restitution of looted cultural works.

Leo Baeck Medal for Ambassador Stuart E. Eizenstat

At the LBI Annual Award Dinner, Jewish Museum Berlin Director W. Michael Blumenthal presented Stuart Eizenstat with the Leo Baeck Medal for his work on behalf of Holocaust survivors.

Jewish Continuity in the 21st Century: Stuart Eizenstat on “The Future of the Jews”

Before accepting the Leo Baeck Medal on January 14, 2014, Ambassador Stuart Eizenstat delivered the 56th Leo Baeck Memorial Lecture, in which he addressed how the imperative to honor the victims of the Holocaust informs the challenges facing the current global Jewish community. In a wide-ranging survey of issues facing Jewish communities today, he addressed…

Jerry Lindenstraus: Sprechen Trotz Allem

Over six-feet tall, impressively agile for his 84 years, and sharply dressed, long-time LBI volunteer Jerry Lindenstraus cuts a striking figure. His faintly continental accent leads many people he meets to ask him where he’s from. That’s not such an easy question to answer. “When I tell them that I lived in Danzig, most people…

What’s in a Name? Dennis Baum and the Simson Company

Dennis Baum fought for restitution of his family’s assets in Germany for years following German reunification in 1990. In January, Baum joined his former negotiating partners in a public forum at the Jewish Museum Berlin to discuss what went wrong 20 years ago. The records of the Simson Company and the case of its restitution…

Research Profile: Michaela Raggam- Blesch on “Half-Jews” in Vienna, 1938–1945

Michaela Raggam-Blesch When I was conducting oral history interviews for the project “Topography of the Shoah in Vienna” in 2010, I met a number of interview partners who had survived the entire war in Vienna as so-called “half-Jews.” Though they ultimately escaped the Nazi genocide, they had lived in the most precarious circumstances in wartime…

WWI Correspondence—Karl Henschel, a Volunteer from Berlin

During the first year of the war, German soldiers sent six million letters every day, and received another 8.5 million. Soldiers’ letters were almost immediately instrumentalized to shape public perceptions about the war, and the publication of letters quickly became an important way of memorializing the fallen, who came in unprecedented numbers. Among the first…

WWI Memoirs—Helmut Freund, a physician from Berlin

About 300 memoirs in LBI collections describe the experiences of Jewish soldiers in the German and Austro-Hungarian armies, from ordinary infantrymen to celebrated pilots to physicians and Jewish field chaplains. Helmut Freund was born around 1896 in Berlin and served as an auxiliary physician in the German Army. Like many highly assimilated, middle-class German Jews…

WWI Photographs—Bernhard Bardach, an Austrian military surgeon

Bernhard Bardach was a 48-year-old career medical officer in the Austro-Hungarian Army when war broke out. He served on the Eastern and Western fronts, but he was able to spend much of his time during the war painting, writing extensive diaries, and taking over 900 remarkable photographs which have been digitized by LBI. Bernhard Bardach…